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I know that the verbal and verbal-noun forms of pixel are pixelate and pixelation, respectively, but what is/are the adverbial form(s) of the term?

I looked on the OED, ODO, Merriam-Webster Online, and even Dictionary.com, and no such forms were listed. Is there even an adverbial form? If not, what would you suggest I use?

Some ideas I’ve thought of have been

  • pixelly
  • pixally
  • pixelatedly

Here’s an example sentence (just made up on the spot, so don’t try to look it up or anything):

The colour of the object depicted on this LCD television screen is red, green, and blue [insert adverb here], but from proper viewing distance the colours produce a bright purple.

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    @EdwinAshworth: Pixelated is an adjective / verb, not an adverb. – SarahofGaia Aug 23 '15 at 16:59
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    Can you give an example sentence where this adverbial form might be useful? – Hellion Aug 23 '15 at 17:13
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    @Hellion: Sure, no problem: The colour of the object depicted on this LCD television screen is red, green, and blue [insert adverb here], but from proper viewing distance the colours produce a bright purple. – SarahofGaia Aug 23 '15 at 17:17
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    One would use the workaround 'is made up of red, blue and green pixels ...'. English has lexical gaps. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 23 '15 at 18:31
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    If you're desperate, the 2012 Segen's Medical Dictionary has an entry for Pixely but I'm unsure if it's a distinct adverb or just a lesser used alternative adjective to pixelated. I vaguely recall discussing how gentlemanly is an adjective here earlier despite ending in the -ly suffix and there are other words like that as well... – Tonepoet Aug 23 '15 at 21:48
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From the question:

Is there even an adverbial form? If not, what would you suggest I use?

Edwin Ashworth has replied to both parts of your question in his comment. Yet you don't seem happy with his reply.

I looked on the OED, ODO, Merriam-Webster Online, and even Dictionary.com and no such forms were listed

So where would Edwin Ashworth (or any of us) look to find the word you want?

Perhaps you could just make it up yourself by adding "ly" to the adjective "pixellated". That would be such a common construction that everyone would know what you mean (if they're ok with "pixel" in the first place).

Otherwise, because "English has lexical gaps" (Edwin Ashworth), there may be no alternative to a workaround.

  • This answer was not very constructive. For one, Edwin Ashworth didn't answer my question; he merely first gave an adjective, which isn't what I needed, and then gave a workaround, which I don't want to do unless, as I stated in my question details, there is no preëxistent word available. It would have been better to directly answer my question instead of offering a roundabout response. For example, "Either there isn't a word, or I don't know of one; but here is a workaround." – SarahofGaia Aug 25 '15 at 16:14
  • And two: "So where would Edwin Ashworth (or any of us) look to find the word you want?" Ever hear of other dictionaries? Or maybe historical resources? Perhaps others have heard or read of an alternate form that I haven't. This should be quite obvious. Why do you think the word-requests tag exists? – SarahofGaia Aug 25 '15 at 16:16
  • Although the suggestions you listed in the last two paragraphs are definitely good ones. So thank you for that. :) – SarahofGaia Aug 25 '15 at 16:18
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Based on your offered example sentence, you don’t actually want an adverb here at all. Rather, you want the corresponding adjective derived from the noun pixel. So simply add ‑ed, either this way:

The colour of the object depicted on this LCD television screen is red, green, and blue pixelled, but from proper viewing distance the colours produce a bright purple.

or this way:

The color of the object depicted on this LCD television screen is red, green, and blue pixelled, but from proper viewing distance the colors produce a bright purple.

or this way:

The color of the object depicted on this LCD television screen is red, green, and blue pixeled, but from proper viewing distance the colors produce a bright purple.

The word is newish, but both useful and used. It has two spellings, as shown in this ngram:

ngram of pixeled, pixelled

However, I question the very premise behind the example sentence.

The color of each constituent pixel on a television monitor is necessarily one of red, blue, or green, since those are the three available pixel types. When viewed normally, the pixels can combine to produce a signal in the human vision system which is indistinguishable from monochromatic violet (380–450 nanometers) through metamerism. Spectral violet at the bottom of the rainbow is a shorter wavelength than blue, so no single pixel on your television can produce it — but metamerism guarantees that you cannot tell the difference.

Indeed, any given pixel can produce only one of three possible colors. It is only through their combination can millions of colors be produced by generating a suitable tristimulous response in the brains of viewers with normal human color vision.

It is also possible that you mean not spectral violet but some combination of red and blue along the line of purples. If so, you should make that clear.

  • Although I thank you for your explanation of metamerism (seriously, I'm gonna read up on that; I appreciate that a lot!), it doesn't really matter. As I said, that was merely an example I used. The fact is I did need the adverbial form of it, NOT the adjectival form. Both forms could work in this context (even the context in the example sentence), but frankly the adverbial form would work much better. – SarahofGaia Aug 25 '15 at 16:08
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I'm going to propose, not a work-around, but a rewrite:

The object depicted on this LCD television screen is made up of red, green, and blue pixels, but from proper viewing distance the colors produce a bright purple.

  • A re-write is a workaround. In any case, that's not what I'd be writing about. – SarahofGaia Aug 25 '15 at 16:19

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