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I'm reading a book where "The Advice Guy" says "Tell your boss the roport will have to wait. There's a powder in Aspen!".

I got, here, what "take a powder" means, but what about "there's a powder in..."?

(google image shows ski images when I search for this expression)

  • Your image search is exact. Powder is fresh-fallen snow. Aspen is a famous ski resort in Colorado. Your phrase could be restated "Tell your boss the report will have to wait, as I'm going skiing." (Made this a comment as I'm having a surprisingly hard time finding sources for "powder" being snow). – Paul Drye Aug 20 '15 at 18:51
  • Paul dude: "Made this a comment as I'm having a surprisingly hard time finding sources for "powder" being snow" did you try using "google"? type in "skiing term powder". – Fattie Aug 20 '15 at 19:02
  • (as far as I know in most languages powder snow is just called, that language's word for "powder". (what else would you call it?) ) – Fattie Aug 20 '15 at 19:07
  • @Joe Blow: I tried snow powder and came up with nothing I'd call I reputable source in the first few pages of results. – Paul Drye Aug 20 '15 at 20:39
  • HI Paul. it's powder snow, and I put a few links in my answer. Anyways no worries. – Fattie Aug 21 '15 at 0:55
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Tell your boss the report will have to wait. There's a powder in Aspen!

This means there is a layer of fine powdered snow (on top of the existing snow cover) at the Aspen, Colorado, ski resort. That layer of powder on top makes for optimal skiing conditions, and might be considered too good to resist.

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The "a" is nothing more than a typo.

It's simply: "there's powder in Aspen"

"Powder" simply means "fresh snow" -- the type that skiers want. It's just a skiing term.

Just google "skiing term powder" for literally 100s of examples,

"Powder: Fresh, dry and lightweight snow that for many is the Holy Grail of skiing and snowboarding. Large amounts of fresh powder make for epic skiing conditions."

The "a" is nothing more than a typographical error. It is meant to read "There's powder in Aspen!"


(Note - there is utterly no connection, in any way, whatsoever, between powder snow (i.e., it looks like powder, talcum powder) and the idiom "take a powder".)

  • About "'Powder' simply means 'fresh snow'": I've shoveled fresh snow that was certainly not powder; "glop" would be a better description. The "dry and lightweight" part of the definition you quoted is an essential part of the meaning. – Andreas Blass Aug 20 '15 at 20:05
  • Yes I saw the shaded box; that's why I referred to it as "the definition you quoted". – Andreas Blass Aug 20 '15 at 20:17
  • Ah hah! -- but you reduced this "fresh snow" -- the type that skiers want to this "fresh snow" – Fattie Aug 20 '15 at 20:21

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