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My son uses fuck or fucking to emphasize his statements. I told him there are words that you can use that aren't so offensive for my 3 year old grandchild to parrot! He asked what word is so globally understood to add emphasis. Also, I am looking for a list of words.

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Robusto, tchrist, Kristina Lopez, Drew Aug 20 '15 at 0:35

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    Perhaps a few minced oaths, such as: Holy cow, holy smoke, bloody Mary, bloody nora (BrEng), darn right, for Pete's sake or goddammit, the latter might be considered equally offensive by some, but I'd consider it less bothersome than fuck. Here's a list, but some expressions are more colourful than others lutins.org/lists/minced_oaths.html There's always the Irish feckin' – Mari-Lou A Aug 19 '15 at 16:11
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    Young people who use "fuck" a lot don't go in for minced oaths. – Robusto Aug 19 '15 at 16:14
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    @Mari-LouA: Easier said than done when you hit your thumb with a hammer. ^_^ – Robusto Aug 19 '15 at 16:24
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    @Rwy5: There is a difference between using them and talking about them. We are talking about them here, and it is the province of this site to do so. – Robusto Aug 19 '15 at 16:27
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    You can't a worthwhile discussion of profanity in language without using profanity. And one person's "frick" is another person's "fuck": the euphemisms soon become offensive to the more easily offended among us. – Robusto Aug 19 '15 at 16:36
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May I be so bold to suggest that it's not emphasis but restraint that is called for here? Raising children myself I know how easy it is to transfer bad habits without meaning to.

Children should be enabled to acquire these bad habits later-on as an adult or at least after puberty sets in.

Definition of restraint in English:
noun
Unemotional, dispassionate, or moderate behaviour; self-control:
'he urged the protesters to exercise restraint'

Reference:
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/restraint

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    agreed. Even if parents think it's OK for their kids to grow up in a profanity-laden household, below a certain age those kids won't know when and where it's OK to swear. – David Garner Aug 19 '15 at 17:10
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It's unclear what the exact circumstances are, but when every third word someone utters is "fuck" or "fucking" it's not for "emphasis". In fact the the ability of the word to "emphasize" is lost when used with such frequency. What they're demonstrating is an inability/unwillingness to think clearly about what they intend to say.

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My two cents: My mother always said Fudge - everyone likes fudge. :)

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"Fucking" as an adjective or adverb can often be replaced by "very". Eg. "It is fucking hot" means "it is very hot". Therefore you can replace "fucking" with more elaborate adjectives such as "extremely", "amazingly" or "incredibly".

"Fuck" can also be used as an arbitrary exclamation, and can be replaced by something colloquial like "wow" or "crikey". Eg. "Fuck, it's hot" means "Wow, it's hot".

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