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What's the difference between “to validate” and “to confirm”? What is more natural to use in day to day situations. Can you confirm this for me? Can you validate this for me? For example, if there is a person who states that she has done something, but cannot provide material evidences of the completed action, and I would like to know if the completed action actually happened and in case it happened, was is completed as described by the person. In this situation what should I ask a witness – third unbiased person who saw the action? "Could you please confirm if the action happened as described?" or "Could you please validate if the action happened as described?"

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I suggest looking up the definitions for a detailed answer. But they have very different meanings.

To validate is to verify, check or prove the authenticity if something, such as a ticket or permit for example.

To confirm is often to acknowledge or restate some fact, such as a theater booking.

You could say "can you confirm that I have a valid ticket for tomorrow night's play"

  • On the other hand, they are synonyms, even if the area/s of overlap is/are quite small. A theory may be validated/confirmed. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 19 '15 at 11:14
  • Let me clarify in what context I ask this question. For example, if there is a person who states that she has done something, but cannot provide material evidences of the completed action, and I would like to know if the completed action actually happened and in case it happened, was is completed as described by the person. In this situation what should I ask a witness – third unbiased person who saw the action? "Could you please confirm if the action happened as described?" or "Could you please validate if the action happened as described?" – drabiv Aug 19 '15 at 18:07
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    In that case, confirm is the better option. validate tends to imply some steps towards a proof are involved, so not needed in your context. – Kim Ryan Aug 19 '15 at 21:16

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