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I am placing request to a customer for a project and I want him to provide some information. I had worked with them in a previous assignment and they failed to provide me most of the details beforehand, so this time I am drafting a mail even before things start out stating my requirements from the customer's side.

Is it good practise to use the word "should"?

For example:

You should give me A, you should give me B to proceed with my work.

I for some reason am feeling this is little bit rude.

P.S. I know I could phrase my request using please send me but there are 15 things actually which I require from them. Would you suggest that I use "Please send" as a prefix to every statement?

  • Why haven't they given you A? Are they reluctant? Have they forgotten? Didn't they realise you needed A? Please explain in more detail. – chasly from UK Aug 18 '15 at 11:33
  • I had worked with them in a previous assignment and they failed to provide me most of the details beforehand , so this time I am drafting a mail even before things start out stating my requirements from the customer's side. – Anarach Aug 18 '15 at 11:35
  • My suggestion, "I am now ready to begin work on your project. Please send me A and I will start work immediately." – chasly from UK Aug 18 '15 at 11:38
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    @FumbleFingers - I would make that more positive, i.e. "Please note that in order to proceed with the work I need all of the following information." --- However, as you say, it's a matter of opinion. – chasly from UK Aug 18 '15 at 11:59
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    @Noah: I'm afraid not - I dunno what to call the grammatical error in your phrasing (it's a bit like a dangling participle), but whatever it is you can't mix the two implied subjects like that (me doing the work, and you sending the info). – FumbleFingers Aug 18 '15 at 12:05
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In general, in English and in other languages, the more words you add the more polite you're being.

Maybe you can say instead,

Kindly provide...

or

Could you {please | kindly} provide?

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