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Take the following simplified sentence:

A,B and C are commonly affected by X.

If I want to formulate a sentence, where the message is to highlight A,B and C; so something like

A, B and C are important because they are the common affectees of process X.

The word affectee does not exist in OED or any other dictionary I look at (although it seems to be used in literature very rarely). Is there a better word for this purpose?

I am OK with using a synonym, so the word does not need to stem from affect.

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  • 1
    This may well be a lexical gap. The workaround 'A, B and C are important here because they are they are things common affected by process X' shows that this is not a vast problem. Commented Aug 16, 2015 at 15:12
  • "Common affectees" could mean those things affected together or not all, incidentally. "Affected" could be used as a plural noun, though. To make it even less clear, just to insist on using the verb to be.
    – stevesliva
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 3:55
  • @EdwinAshworth I thought so (re:lexical gap).. Thanks for the suggestion but this will go into my doctoral thesis, so I'd like to avoid using words like "things". I feel I need to be more specific somehow..
    – posdef
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 8:10
  • @stevesliva well, I admit the word common might be misleading there, but that's besides the point. "ultimate affectees" work to same effect for my use case. I don't follow the other half of your comment, how do you suggest I use "affected" as a noun?
    – posdef
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 8:11
  • Did I really leave 2 mistakes in that comment? A superfluous 'they are' and a missing 'ly'. However, a workaround is always needed to bridge a lexical gap. And if you don't specify A, B, C and X, it's impossible for answerers to be more specific than 'things'. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:24

4 Answers 4

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I think that subject would work in such a sentence:

A, B and C are important because they are the common subjects to process X.
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Here are a few proposals to help you express your ideas in your thesis.

  1. A, B and C are important because they are the common reformates of process X. (Borrowed from chemistry.)

  2. A, B and C are important because they are simultaneously affected by process X.

  3. A, B and C are important because they are the common processes affected by X. (I don't know if A, B and C are processes, but whatever they are, that's the word to put after "common.")

  4. A, B and C are important because they are the common products of process X.

  5. Modelling your situation as a directed graph could be helpful. Draw a directed graph with arrows going from X to A, X to B, and X to C. Explain that an arrow pointing from vertex P to vertex Q will mean that process P affects process Q. Then you can say that A, B and C are important because they are the terminal vertices of X.

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When the process has good outcomes, we say "beneficiaries" and when it has bad outcomes, we say "casualties", but these are value-laden. For neutral words, you could try maths or computer science.

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  • how do you mean "you could try maths or computer science"?
    – posdef
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 8:13
  • @posdef - I think he means to try those StackExchange sites. Commented Aug 18, 2015 at 3:16
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The word "CONSEQUENT" may be used which means something which results logically from the antecedent.

"Resultant" or "effect" can also be used to effectively convey the intended meaning.

__A, B, & C are important because they are the common consequences/ effects/results(resultants) of process X.

Of course, if the intended message is to suffer the effect of resultant consequence, not the result, it is better to use the phrase, "enjoying/suffering consequences.

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