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I am writing a dissertation on musical education in developing countries.

I would like to find titles for my section that are catchy.

Does anyone have any recommendations for resources of music-related idioms or English phrases I could use?

I am not thinking about musical vocabulary, e.g. tenor, staccato, adagio, clarinet.

I am rather referring to phrases like "tin ear", "dance to the beat of your own drum", "blow your own horn", "fit as a fiddle", etc.

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  • This question is music to my ears. Or maybe not - that one doesn't work very well in a text-based medium. Actually, I'm afraid it's an Off Topic "list" type question. Aug 13, 2015 at 19:47
  • @FumbleFingers It's rather a "request for recommendations" question, and all that jazz... Aug 13, 2015 at 20:20
  • Sadly, that's also Off Topic (request for resources) Aug 13, 2015 at 20:34
  • You absolutely must use "Difficult second album" somewhere, and "Contractual Obligation" :)
    – Marv Mills
    Aug 13, 2015 at 20:35
  • Based on the subject of your dissertation I’m guessing that your goal is to begin (or continue) your career as a music Teacher. Anyway, I hope that this is the case because your question indicates to me that your lucky Students have/would have a dynamic Teacher with creative ideas! Unfortunately, being “close enough for jazz” doesn’t seem to be quite close enough here to avoid running afoul of the criteria for acceptable questions. Good luck!
    – Papa Poule
    Aug 14, 2015 at 14:15

2 Answers 2

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Try searching online for music idioms

I did and the second thing that came up was this

Learn English Today

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I am thinking to Music has charms to soothe a savage breast

what means:

Music has the power to enchant even the roughest of people. This proverb comes from the play The Mourning Bride, by William Congreve, an English author of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

from The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy.

Also the simple idiom : "music soothes the soul"

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