0

"I waved her in dismissal and left the room only to perceive the fact that she’s never left my mind." I don't really get it.

  • Where did you find it? If you quote someone's words it's good practice to disclose the source. Sometimes that really helps us to give a good answer as well :-) Also, what makes you think that she did the waving as you suggest in the title? – chasly from UK Aug 12 '15 at 9:10
  • It's hard to tell without more context, but in this case I suspect that "dismissal" means a sort of rejection or disparagement. Typically the "wave" would be made with the palm facing forward, then the hand is rotated forward at the wrist in a sort of "go away" motion. – Hot Licks Aug 12 '15 at 11:49
1

You may say "I signaled her," but "wave" doesn't similarly take a direct object as the target of the gesture. You have to say

I waved at her in dismissal and left the room, only to perceive the fact that she’s never left my mind.

This means that I dismissed her (i.e., told her to leave) with a wave of my hand. (We use the word "dismissive" for the gesture to indicate that the person should leave our presence as no longer worth consideration.) Then I, myself then left the room, only to find that while I could order her to leave my presence, I couldn't get her out of my mind.

(An aside: the tenses don't really work. "Only to perceive" means that the perception follows closely on the dismissal and the leaving, making the present perfect, "she's left" = "she has left", inapt. Better -- "since then I have realized that she never left my mind.")

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.