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The phrase "Can anyone of you" is often found on the Internet. If I paste another word instead of "you" into this phrase in the search box, I get results close to 0%.

Can anyone of the native speakers of English give advice about this phrase?

or

Can anyone of the grammarians here explain to me what's wrong with this example?

Is it correct to use this phrase with the words other than "you" after "anyone of"?

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    Apparently it's a common error to write "anyone of you" instead of "any one of you". – Hellion Aug 11 '15 at 18:40
  • Answered at 'Meaning: “Any more” in context '. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 11 '15 at 22:17
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Can anyone of the native speakers of English give advice about this phrase?

The above is grammatically incorrect. This is because there is a difference between "anyone" and "any one"

The word "anyone" is a pronoun. Thus we can say "Anyone can do that."

You cannot say "Can he of the native speakers..." and you cannot say "Can anyone of the native speakers..."

The correct sentence is,

Can any one of the native speakers of English give advice about this phrase?

There is redundancy in that version so you can contract it to,

"Can any of the native speakers..."

or

"Can one of the native speakers..."

Does that explain it or do you need more detail?

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You can also say something along the lines of:

"Can anyone of British descent give insight..."

  • Yes, that is the normal pronoun usage. The declarative form would be, "Anyone of British descent can give insight..." – chasly from UK Aug 11 '15 at 19:31

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