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When you increase your distance you go farther.
When you increase your speed you go faster.
When you increase your acceleration you go ______?
I just can't think of the word to describe the increase of acceleration, I almost thought accelerate but that's the same as go faster.

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  • 2
    When you increase your acceleration you go faster, faster? Is there a particular context you need this for? I don't think you'll find a word for this since the concept is a pretty modern scientific one; it's not something that we particularly detect or care about as humans. Aug 11 '15 at 17:23
  • That's kind of what I was worried about. As for context, I'll be using it on a button for a game, but I limited space and increase acceleration doesn't quite fit. Aug 11 '15 at 17:27
  • I'm not posting this as an answer because it does not quite fit the question exactly as it's phrased but I would suggest naming the button accelerate as in "When you increase your acceleration, you accelerate." If that doesn't fit, I'd abbreviate it to "Accel." in order to save space and what is meant should be fairly clear.
    – Tonepoet
    Aug 11 '15 at 18:06
  • 1
    Tonepoet, to accelerate is to increase velocity, not acceleration, it even says that in the link you have. Aug 11 '15 at 18:11
  • Hmm... wavier? more time dilated?
    – jxh
    Aug 11 '15 at 18:38
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The term in physics for the rate of change in acceleration appears to be "jerk", "jolt", "lurch", or "surge".

So maybe the comparative form is "jerkier"?

I would probably just say you "go faster faster".

See the Wikipedia article.

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    Jerk is (somewhat surprisingly) the technical term for the derivative of acceleration (i.e. if jerk is positive your acceleration is increasing.)
    – DRF
    Aug 11 '15 at 17:38
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    @DRF If I have to be exposed to a jerk, I guess I prefer a positive jerk. Aug 11 '15 at 17:40
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    It may not quite be what the OP wants. "Increase the acceleration until the pilot is pressed firmly into the seat back" ... not the same as: "Jerk until the pilot is pressed firmly into the seat back." Maybe surge would work here.
    – GEdgar
    Aug 11 '15 at 17:41
  • If you told me something was getting jerkier, I'd probably think of increasingly abrupt and unpredictable changes in pace or direction, like a jalopy trying to go uphill while running out of gas or a wavering hand at the onset of a nervous breakdown, more than anything else. That is because the intermediary form is jerky. Pressing a button to make the plane jerkier sounds dangerous for that reason, in fact..
    – Tonepoet
    Aug 11 '15 at 23:16
  • Thanks, I think I am going to go with "go faster, faster". Aug 11 '15 at 23:51
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In a long career in physics I have never met a general word that describes an increasing acceleration in the same way that acceleration describes an increasing velocity.

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  • In a fairly long career in teaching maths, I'd never met a term used to describe the rate of change of acceleration wrt time. But I have now, thanks to Dog Lover and Wikipedia. Aug 11 '15 at 22:11
  • Back in summer class at Centre College in, I think, 1965, I was told that the term is "jerk".
    – Hot Licks
    Aug 12 '15 at 2:12
  • The trouble with jerk and similar words is that, although correctly associated with a sudden increase in acceleration (which occurs with a sudden increase in applied force) they describe a phenomenon of limited duration only. They do not describe the general concept of an increasing acceleration.
    – Anton
    Aug 13 '15 at 9:33
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"Thrust" as in to apply more thrust.

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  • That isn't even necessarily acceleration.
    – Hot Licks
    Aug 12 '15 at 2:12
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You go at an increased rate of acceleration.

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