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What do you call the latter part of the afternoon when parents are scrambling to pick up children, shop, clean up and cook? In Danish we call it the hour of the wolf, knowing, that it also refers to the time between night and day (3pm to 5pm). But what's the proper wording in English?

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    I call it "nap time". – Hot Licks Aug 11 '15 at 13:49
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    I don't believe I have ever heard that time specifically categorised in the UK, other than "school run time" which doesn't really convey your cited meaning very well... – Marv Mills Aug 11 '15 at 13:53
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    Longfellow writes of "a pause in the day’s occupations, / That is known as the Children’s Hour." The challenge is to devise an antonym for that expression, in terms of leisureliness, but still explicitly relevant to children. – Brian Donovan Aug 11 '15 at 14:44
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    @BrianDonovan, I like it -- "Children's Hour" -- No need to devise an antonym, just use it ironically (literally) or tweak it into "Brat's Hour". – SoSaysSunny Aug 11 '15 at 19:25
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    I call it time for a stiff drink. – Minnow Sep 11 '15 at 1:38
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I don't think there's a widely-accepted term for late afternoon but I have heard one proposed. According to Sheldon Cooper on the US comedy show The Big Bang Theory (YouTube of scene):

Prevening: "It's a time of day I invented. It better defines the ambiguous period between afternoon and evening. Prevening. Fairly certain it will catch on as it fills a desperate need."

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    To me that evokes the Puritan concept of prevenient grace, -ing and -ent being both present participial endings. – Brian Donovan Aug 11 '15 at 20:08
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In the USA, a similar term sometimes used for the crunch times of day in the morning and late afternoon/early evening is

drive time

  1. The time of day during which commuters go to and from work:

This term has a strong association as a radio term though. The term rush hour suggested in the comments to your question (and which, I think should be an answer) may be a more general term for the same times.

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