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Where sign language was found among Native American tribes it was largely uniform.

I don't know what the real subject is in this statement and what it means here. Why are tribes and it, both nouns, continuously written? How can I interpret this sentence? Need your help. :)

closed as unclear what you're asking by RegDwigнt Aug 11 '15 at 10:45

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  • What do you think the "it" refers to? And what does "continuously written" even mean? The question is unclear. – RegDwigнt Aug 11 '15 at 10:45
  • @RegDwigнt Erm, I imagine "continuously written" means written together without any intervening words. So that they aren't, discontinuous. – Araucaria Aug 11 '15 at 22:02
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'It' refers to 'sign language' - there is nothing else in that sentence that it could refer to.

It often helps to turn a sentence around to get a better understanding:

Where sign language was found among Native American tribes it was largely uniform.
Sign language was largely uniform where it was found among Native American tribes.

  • Thank you! Now, I understand what the sentence means. :D – GRE Aug 11 '15 at 9:06

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