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What does "You just happened to have it on you" mean in the following conversation?

R: There are some things in my research log which might be relevant to your case. Now that you have stopped blustering, I'll read you some things before my patient returns.

B: You just happened to have it on you.

closed as off-topic by tchrist, TimLymington, Dan Bron, Edwin Ashworth, FumbleFingers Aug 12 '15 at 17:32

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    wouldn't this be better on an ESL site ? – Fattie Aug 10 '15 at 12:52
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    You've chosen the wrong answer! In this particular instance, @Aparente's answer is correct. The speaker is being cynical or sarcastic. – Araucaria Aug 10 '15 at 16:10
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R: There are some things in my research log which might be relevant to your case. Now that you have stopped blustering, I'll read you some things before my patient returns.

B: You just happened to have it on you.

B is being sarcastic, and making fun of R. It isn't typical to carry around one's research log. B is thinking, "Isn't it weird that just when this disagreement occurs, R can conveniently whip out his research log to back up his point of view?"

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It means B thinks this is a coincidence (or unlikely or unplanned) that R has the diary with him at that moment.

Another example:

A: can you give me back my sunglasses next time I see you? B: I happen to have them here right now! I can give them back to you now.

Here, B didn't plan to return A's sunglasses at that moment (the sunglasses could have easily been at home instead) but B "happened to have them" with him (ie he wasn't planning on returning the glasses, he just had them with him coincidentally).

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