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Since adjectives are used to describe nouns, can verbs be used to describe nouns as well?

For example:

Two men standing with clenched fists are US athletes.

Here fist is a noun and to describe a noun, an adjective is used. In this case the adjective should be clenched but the dictionary shows that clenched is a verb.

So does that mean that verbs are also used to describe nouns?

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    Verbs have various forms that can be used as adjectives; they're called participles and one kind ends in -ing and the other either looks like a past tense (like clenched) or is a different form altogether (like sung). So even if a word is being used as an adjective, it can be a verb. Or a noun. – John Lawler Aug 9 '15 at 0:13
  • @JohnLawler -- So, is 'clenched' in the above example is a verb or a noun or an adjective ? – iamRR Aug 10 '15 at 6:53
  • it's not a noun, but it is a verb form being used as an adjective, so it's both a verb and an adjective. – John Lawler Aug 10 '15 at 13:56
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There is nothing special about the word clenched: virtually all participles can be used not only in verb phrases alone but also as participial adjectives in noun phrases.

However, you should also keep in mind that not all words that modify nouns are adjectives, nor does modification of a noun automatically make a word an adjective.

In answer to the question posed in comments as to whether in

Lack of infrastructure facility can be a major cause for under development.

The word infrastructure is an adjective or a noun, the answer is that it is a noun, not an adjective.

If it were an adjective, it would accept adverbs as modifiers, but it does not: you cannot say a ∗very infrastructure development or a ∗quickly infrastructure development.

Because it is a noun, it accepts as modifiers either adjectives or other nouns, as in critical infrastructure development or city infrastructure development.

The adjective corresponding to the noun infrastructure is infrastructural.

Modifying nouns does not make in and of itself make something an adjective; there are other criteria. Nouns can modify nouns, and so can verbs.

  • @oerkelens Length requirements forbid one-bit answers. :) – tchrist Aug 8 '15 at 22:36
  • @tchrist -- Okay, but how do I recognize a verb, noun or an adjective in a sentence ? – iamRR Aug 10 '15 at 6:26
  • @tchrist -- consider the sentence 'Lack of infrastructure facility can be a major cause for under development'. Please tell me, is 'infrastructure' an adjective or a noun ? – iamRR Oct 4 '15 at 15:20
  • @iamRR Infrastructure is a noun, not an adjective. If it were an adjective, it would accept adverbs as modifiers, but it does not: you cannot say a ∗very infrastructure development or a ∗quickly infrastructure development. Because it is a noun, it accepts as modifiers either adjectives or other nouns, as in critical infrastructure development or city infrastructure development. See the difference? The adjective corresponding to the noun infrastructure is infrastructural. Modifying nouns does not make something an adjective; there are other criteria. Nouns can modify nouns. – tchrist Oct 4 '15 at 19:18
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    @iamRR Please do not add supplementary questions in comments. There are questions here about attributive nouns; please research, show your research, and ask another question if you can't find anything (someone will find the duplicate). – Andrew Leach Oct 4 '15 at 19:30
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Mr.clenched is both form of words, noun as well as verb. Read meaning of words in full. You may need Google to find meaning use following format

define:clenched

This will show as followsuse define:clenched as noun in google

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