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This question already has an answer here:

In indirect speech present perfect tense is back shifted to past perfect tense. For example - John said, "I have written a letter." (Direct speech) John said that he had written a letter. (Indirect speech)

But why I see in news articles that the present perfect tense is often not back shifted to past perfect tense ?

For example - The President said that investigators have conducted hearings on different issues. (Direct speech - President said "The investigators have conducted hearings on different issues"

Why often I see in news articles that present perfect tense is not back shifted to past perfect tense though in almost every book its written present perfect tense is to be converted to past perfect tense in reported speech ? Please advise me on it. Thank You

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, Mitch, tchrist, Chenmunka, FumbleFingers Aug 12 '15 at 17:44

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You don't have to change the tense if you're referring to a situation that hasn't changed, or is still relevant to the present.

Direct: Paul said "My new job is very interesting". Indirect: 'Paul said that his new job is very interesting' OR 'Paul said that his new job was very interesting'.

  • Hello, Mairi. True, but covered here before. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 7 '15 at 21:27
  • @Mari -- If the situation has changed and someone uses 'is' in your example then will that be acceptable and grammatically correct ? One more query, what do you eman by 'relevant to the present' ? – iamRR Aug 8 '15 at 5:12

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