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Which is better and is one of them invalid? Are they equivalent or do I have to specify that we talked about the project everytime in the second phrase?

During my internship, I had weekly meetings where we discussed about the project.

or

During my internship, I had a weekly meeting where we discussed about the project.
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    I'd change "where" to "in which" and drop the "about.," "discussed about" is not idiomatic. I prefer the first one: "During my internship, I had weekly meetings (with? advisor?) in which we discussed the project."
    – ewormuth
    Aug 4, 2015 at 19:25
  • @ewormuth: Or change discussed to talked, which allows about to be retained. I don't really see any reason to favour in which over where in this exact context. Aug 4, 2015 at 21:19
  • Because "where," though its use is becoming widespread, should only refer to places -- "Ann is the kind of person where you don't know whether you love her or hate her" vs. "I love San Francisco, where you can enjoy many kinds of cuisine." I'll concede that this one is kind of borderline, but "when" might work too. As a 30+ year English prof, the "where" thing really grates on me, but when I hear the President or CNN anchors using it, I know that at some point I'll have to give up the ghost. Could also be "during which."
    – ewormuth
    Aug 4, 2015 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

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I think the first one is correct. The second one could potentially mean you had only one weekly meeting.

The following sentence is equivalent to the first one.

During my internship, I had a meeting each week where we discussed about the project.

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Yes, in this case, you are referring to all the meetings, which happened weekly, so you would say:

During my internship, I had weekly meetings where we discussed about the project.

However, your "about the project" is awkward and unnecessary, so I would suggest you remove the word "about" and say:

During my internship, I had weekly meetings where we discussed the project.

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