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Is it correct to use "with" twice in this phrase?

The ability of the people to acquaint themselves with and work together with ..."

Or should I say: "The ability of the people to acquaint themselves and work together with ..."

closed as primarily opinion-based by FumbleFingers, Mari-Lou A, Chenmunka, Misti, Avon Aug 6 '15 at 14:40

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    I'm not sure either construction is meaningful without more context, but the second is almost certainly less valid. (There is no rule that a word can't be used twice in the same sentence.) – Hot Licks Aug 1 '15 at 17:19
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The second suggests that two things are being discussed: the ability of people to get to know each other; and the ability of people to work with ... This is a strange mixture of ideas and does not read well.

The first suggests very clearly that two things are being discussed: the ability of people to get to know ... and the ability of people to work with ... These two ideas focus on the same object ("...") and make good sense.

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If you want to omit one with, make it clear that the remaining instance applies to both abilities by using commas:

The ability of the people to acquaint themselves, and work together, with other people ...

In general, though, it's clearer to use both, because the second ability may get long-winded, and by the time you get to the with you've forgotten the first ability:

The ability of the people to acquaint themselves, and work in a productive manner that adheres to company policy, together with other people ...

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