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“I’m afraid I’ll have to take it away when you’ve finished”

Is this good English? Shouldn't we use simple present tense in "when" clause when the main sentence is simple future tense? Is “I’m afraid I’ll have to take it away when you are finished,” better?

Further more, in real life I often hear people say something like “I’m afraid I’ll have to take it away when you will be finished,”, is this grammatically wrong?

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    I hear the first one and the second one pretty regularly... I've never heard the "will be" version... ever... possibly because it's completely wrong. – Catija Jul 28 '15 at 18:25
  • What about "if"? If you will take seat, we can begin. Or "if you take a seat, we can begin"? – shenkwen Jul 28 '15 at 18:28
  • @shenkwen This is a different construction to your OP example. The latter works the same with when or if. But in this later case you can say "If you'll take a seat we can begin" or " ...we will begin". – WS2 Jul 28 '15 at 18:31
  • In If you will take your seat will is not futurive but volitive: it expresses your willingness to take your seat, not your future performance of taking your seat. – StoneyB on hiatus Jul 28 '15 at 18:41
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In are finished, finished is an 'deverbal' adjective, no longer a verb, so using that would change the meaning slightly.

(If are finished were a verb, a passive, it would imply that somebody or something 'finished' you.)

Keeping to the active verb sense of finish, you may say either you have finished or you finish; both you finish and you have finished are present as far as tense goes. The difference between them is very slight in this sort of context. When you finish entails when you have finished, since the very moment after you finish something you have finished it.

A futurive construction (When you will {finish / have finished / be finished}) would not be suitable here. When clauses with explicit futures are commonly used in two contexts:

  • as non-restrictive bound relatives

    Check with me tomorrow, when I'll have finished proofing your paper.
    Check with me tomorrow, when I'll be finished with proofing your paper.
    Check with me tomorrow, when I'll finish proofing your paper.

  • as "future beyond future" fused relatives

    By tomorrow I should know when I will have finished proofing your paper.
    By tomorrow I should know when I will be finished with proofing your paper.
    By tomorrow I should know when I will finish proofing your paper.

But in other contexts present-tense constructions are preferred.

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