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When writing about the speed limit on two different roads, is it correct to say:

  1. "The speed limits on Hunt Brothers Road and State Road 17 will both be reduced to 45 miles per hour,"

or

  1. "The speed limit on Hunt Brothers Road and State Road 17 will both be reduced to 45 miles per hour"
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    Since the numerical value is the same in both cases, one would normally refer to them/it using the singular, but it's really a matter of stylistic or precise nuance (does the writer think of them as two different limits that happen to currently be equal, or one limit that happens to apply in two different places?). – FumbleFingers Jul 28 '15 at 17:32
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As they stand, only the first of your examples is correct. If, however, you remove "both" from the second example, both of the examples are correct, although they have, potentially, distinct meanings. The first example refers to the actual speed limits on the two roads; the second example (without "both") refers to the idea of a speed limit on both roads.

However, in practical terms, the distinction between the meanings (after "both" is removed from the second example) is likely to be a distinction without a real difference, unless at some point the context makes clear (a) that the speed limits on the two roads differ, and (b) that the difference between the speed limits on the two roads is somehow relevant.

Note that "both" can be also be removed from the first example without changing either its grammaticality or its meaning.

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