3

Which one is correct?

  • They went on their honeymoon to Italy.
  • They went for their honeymoon to Italy.
  • What do Google searches suggest? – Edwin Ashworth Jul 18 '15 at 8:54
  • With the preposition on the possessive pronoun does not usually occur -- "They went on honeymoon to Italy." OTOH, "They went for their honeymoon to Italy" is fine. – Kris Jul 18 '15 at 10:27
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    @Kris Absolute nonsense. “They went on their honeymoon” is perfectly standard and common. In American English, at least, I'd say it's the most common way of phrasing it. Compare how “they went on their honeymoon to” yields about 3,000 Google hits, while “they went for their honeymoon to” yields only 22 hits. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jul 18 '15 at 10:57
  • Note that most of the hits for "for" involved Indian-sounding names, so I would surmise that it's considered normal to say it that way there. – Steven Littman Jul 18 '15 at 14:19
2

I prefer the sentences to be inverted.

•They went to Italy on their honeymoon.

•They went to Italy for their honeymoon.

They went to Italy on their honeymoon - this means that whilst they were honeymooning, they took a trip to Italy. They may also have taken trips to other places during the same honeymoon. The sentence can be paraphrased, "They went to Italy whilst on their honeymoon."

They went to Italy for their honeymoon - this means that they went to Italy for the whole period of their honeymoon. Italy was their honeymoon location of choice.

Answer

Both are correct - they have different meanings.

EDIT

@hd01 - I'll add to my answer in order to address your comment about the first sentence being a quotation from a textbook.

If someone said to me, "They went on their honeymoon to Italy", the precise meaning would depend both on context and intonation. As I have been given neither, I can only go on what is written. Here is a plausible context that I have invented.

"The couple had a choice. They could cancel their honeymoon to Italy or John could attend the job interview. They went on their honeymoon to Italy."

Note that in this context "honeymoon-to-Italy" is inseparable. I'll show this explicitly.

"The couple had a choice. They could cancel their honeymoon-to-Italy or John could attend the job interview. They went on their honeymoon-to-Italy."

This means that the example given in the textbook is justifiable but it has yet another meaning which is quite distinct from "They went to Italy on their honeymoon."

I may have been hasty in inverting the sentences but my versions are much more likely. The textbook version requires contextualisation in order to be idiomatic.

I hope this helps,

  • I have seen the first sentence in ' English vocabulary in use, Elementary' book of Cambridge University Press (Unit 2) – hd01 Jul 18 '15 at 9:22
  • @hd01 - What you have omitted from your question is context. English is a context-dependent language. The same phrase can have different meanings according to what comes before it. Is the text online? Do have a link to the actual page? In any case I'll add to my answer to cover the implied question in your comment. – chasly from UK Jul 18 '15 at 10:06
  • -1 Do not rephrase :) This is not the answer. – Kris Jul 18 '15 at 10:24
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    Note that in American English at least, “They went on their honeymoon to Italy” would be a perfectly common, standard way of expressing that Italy was the destination of their honeymoon; that they honeymooned in Italy. Even “They went to Italy on their honeymoon” would likely be assumed (unless context suggested otherwise) to mean the same thing. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jul 18 '15 at 11:00
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    @JanusBahsJacquet - It looks as though my answer is more based on my personal opinion than I thought. I won't change it now - I'll leave it for hd01 to judge. Additionally I'll put in a plea that questioners should be urged to give context. A simple bit of background information or a quote from the surrounding text can make a world of difference in how English is interpreted. – chasly from UK Jul 18 '15 at 11:18

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