3

Example:

Contrary to popular belief, depression is more about 'hows' than 'whys'. And sometimes we even use logic to try to justify it.

I think contrary to popular belief is too formal. Is another way of saying it? (I thought about phrases with unlike, but I think that word is kind of formal, too).

  • 2
    Forget what you think you know, I don’t think it’s too formal. It’s said in casual conversation all the time. So is Despite what you may have heard. – Jim Jul 17 '15 at 5:00
3

Maybe something along the lines of

Despite what (many) people (often) think/assume/believe

e.g.

Despite what people think, depression is more about 'hows' than 'whys'. And sometimes we even use logic to try to justify it.

1

How about:

Most people don't know this, but depression is more about 'hows' than 'whys'. And sometimes we even use logic to try to justify it.

1

Perhaps it's nothing but an urban legend (also urban myth)

A humorous or horrific story or piece of information circulated as though true, especially one purporting to involve someone vaguely related or known to the teller.

Oxford Dictionaries Online

  • This seems to capture the opposite of the desired expression... OP wants something like "despite the urban legend..." – Caleb Jul 17 '15 at 1:58
  • @CalebBernard Exactly! I am suggesting that urban legend is parallel to popular belief, not the whole phrase contrary to popular belief – bib Jul 17 '15 at 11:06
0

You might say, "it might surprise you that" or "I was shocked to find out that." If you want to be especially informal, you could use "go figure."

0

"It's a little-known fact..."

-Cliff Clavin

(Do not actually use. Admirably succinct, though.)

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