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Which of the following two phrases correct: "I expect better of you" or "I expect better off you"?

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, Kristina Lopez, Hellion, ScotM, tchrist Jul 16 '15 at 22:27

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    I expect better off you is not an idiom I have ever heard. – Alex W Jul 16 '15 at 18:13
  • Neither had I. It was a correction I received from a British English speaker. – Trixie G. Jul 16 '15 at 18:36
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    @TrixieG. Perhaps a British English speaker with one of their many obscure regional accents? Unless he's just tried to steal your watch, and found it to be a lower quality item than the rest of your apparel suggests. – Wayfaring Stranger Jul 16 '15 at 19:24
  • @TrixieG. Were you corrected in the same context as posed in your question? "Better off" is a fine combination of words in certain situations, though not in this case. – Etheur Jul 16 '15 at 20:37
  • Are you sure the word in question is off rather than of as spoken with an accent and/or speech impediment? (@WayfaringStranger, that's awesome: "Your wallet's empty! I expected better off you!") – Adam Katz Jul 16 '15 at 20:39
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If you mean "I expect you to do better", then "better of you" is correct.

Usually, "better off" describes the outcome of a situation. For example: "you would be better off if you stopped working now and get some sleep" or "we are better off not knowing how the sausage gets made."

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While both are grammatically correct, I've only ever heard "better of" in this context.

I can maybe think of an example where "better off" would be correct. Perhaps if I picked your pocket and only found Monopoly money, I might then say "I expect better off you", but that's a pretty huge stretch.

The simplest explanation is that whoever corrected you was wrong.

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(a) "I expect better of you" the usual phrase.

(b) "I expect better from you" a valid alternative to (a)

(c) "I expect better off you" a substandard or possibly regional version

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