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The NFL could be set to ban helmets. The chairman of the National Football League’s Health and Safety Advisory Commission thinks American football could ban helmets in the future, as experts say they give players a false sense of security. The company has tried to reduce the risk of head injuries over the last five years and recently reached an almost one billion dollar legal settlement with ex-players suffering from head trauma, depression, memory loss, and mood swings.

My question: Does with in "The company ... legal settlement with ex-players" mean an agreement between 'The company' and 'ex-players' (which doesn't make sense(?)) OR an agreement between 'The company' and 'legal organizations' for the benefits of ex-players?

In the quoted text it doesn't make sense that one billion dollar has been taken from ex-players, it should mean (?) ex-players one billion dollar has been considered for ex-players. But according to Wikipedia: In law, a settlement is a resolution between disputing parties about a legal case, reached either before or after court action begins.

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It is referring to the legal settlement between "the company" and the "ex-players." The billion dollars is being given to the players, not the company. You have to look at the context to see which side is being disputed against.

  • So it means that billion dollars is given to the players BY the company? as the company HAD TO pay that's why is mention legal settlement? – L.G. Jul 14 '15 at 14:02
  • @AlphaE yes; they players were the ones injured by the helmets (context) and they pressed charges against the company. – Blubberguy22 Jul 14 '15 at 14:04
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    @AlphaE The company (the NFL) did not HAVE to pay - they were not compelled to do so as the result of a legal decision. A 'settlement' is an agreement out of court: the NFL agreed to pay the ex-players so the trial would not go to all the way to a decision. – StoneyB Jul 14 '15 at 22:39
  • @StoneyB indeed, I forgot to notice that AlphaE said it was a settlement. Thanks for clarifying. – Blubberguy22 Jul 15 '15 at 13:12

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