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Can as well as be a conjunction that connects two independent sentences? The reference to the relevant rules and similar threads would be much appreciated.

The training program will be introduced more easily, if the video materials are offered, as well as it is possible to involve skillful specialists demonstrating response strategies in practice.

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    There have been many other questions involving this expression here. A Norwegian university hosts this article on the English phrase. And though it is a conjunction of sorts, it is not one to link two whole clauses as in your example. – Brian Donovan Jul 13 '15 at 12:38
  • @Brian makes a good point, as well as I completely agree. The cited usage (and my simpler version) are not "valid". – FumbleFingers Jul 13 '15 at 12:56
  • @Brian Donovan thanks. Which conjunction should be used in this example? If should be a part of each clause in italics. – user128024 Jul 13 '15 at 12:57
  • @user128024: What exactly is the relationship (and between which elements) that you want to express? Probably just and is all you need, but you should think about rearranging the sequence... The training program will be introduced more easily, and it will be possible to involve skillful specialists demonstrating response strategies in practice, if the video materials are offered. Note that you should echo the first will be, not switch to is possible, for consistency. Also, the if clause can equally well appear at the start (but not between the "and" clauses). – FumbleFingers Jul 13 '15 at 13:06
  • Yes, and would do nicely. If you want to go with two if clauses, I would suggest if the video materials are offered, and if skillful specialists demonstrate response strategies in practice. (If it is merely possible to involve such demonstration, but none in fact takes place, then the mere possibility surely does not result in the training program's being introduced more easily.) – Brian Donovan Jul 13 '15 at 13:11
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That particular usage sounds awkward but yes, it is a perfectly usable conjunction.

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    I think it's somewhat worse than "awkward". For me, as well as simply doesn't work for conjoining two fully-formed statements. I'm not a complete pedant (some of the usage restrictions here go beyond what many competent native speakers would honour in normal conversation), but I don't think learners should be told that the cited example is "acceptable". It's not. – FumbleFingers Jul 13 '15 at 12:54

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