2

1) Don't force your friends to do what you want to do.

2) Don't force your friends to do what you want to.

3) Don't force your friends to do what you want.

I think

1) is 'Don't force your friends to do something. You want to do something.'

And

3) is 'Don't force your friends to do something. You want something.'

But generally, forcing is kind of acts so I think 1) is the most grammatical sentence.

But now I have still a few questions.

2) Don't force your friends to do what you want to. - > Is it grammatically correct?

2) If it is possible, what is the difference between 1) to 3)?

2

1) and 2) are the same. The word "do" is elided but understood at the end of 2). They mean, "You want to do something. Don't force your friends to do that same something." Suppose you want to see the movie Fast and Furious 7. If you're a good person, you won't force your friends to go with you.

3) means, "You want something done. Don't force your friends to do that something. Suppose you need money, and you think robbing a bank would be a good way to get it. If you're a good person, you won't force your friends to rob a bank for you. Whether you're willing to go with them or not.

  • Dang, we both came up with the same example for #1! – Caleb Jul 9 '15 at 6:05
  • @CalebBernard That just means that you are very, very clever. – deadrat Jul 9 '15 at 6:21
  • Thanks for your comment, but I am so sorry that I am still confused. It will be really good for me to give me other examples like you wrote. Anyway, as you said, I really understood that 1) , 2) are same. Although you guys said that 1) and 3) have differences, I can't make it clear. So can you give me other example? – Young Jul 9 '15 at 8:34
  • 1) and 2) say not to force your friends to accompany you in some activity. So if you want to go to a movie or go dancing, you shouldn't force your friends to dance or see the movie with you. 3) says not to force your friends to do your bidding. Your parents might force to do what they want, which might be to do your homework. They have no intention of doing homework with you. They just want you to do it. That's the difference -- 1) and 2) are about actions that you do; 3) is about actions you want done. – deadrat Jul 9 '15 at 10:45
1

1) This means that you want to do something, and you make your friends do it with you, even though they would rather not. So if you and your friend want to go to different movies, but you make them go to the movie you want, someone might say this to you.

2) I'd say this is the same as 1, with the word 'do' implied.

3) This means that you force your friends to do something, but you may or may not want to do it yourself. For instance, if you don't want to, say, take out the garbage, so you make your friend do it instead, someone could say this to you. It could be rewritten as "Don't force your friends to do what you want them to do."

  • I suggest that it not only could be rewitten, but should be rewritten as "Don't force your friends to do what you want them to do." – Brian Hitchcock Jul 9 '15 at 6:33

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