8

I can't explain this perfectly, but what do you call a girl/boy who talks with unnecessary style, childish whim, and extra gestures (like small kids sometimes do to attract people's attention).

11

If these gestures are exaggerated, I'd suggest "flamboyant"; if staged, then "affected."

affected:

  • assumed artificially; unnatural; feigned: affected sophistication; an affected British accent.

flamboyant:

  • florid; ornate; elaborately styled: flamboyant speeches.

(dictionary.reference.com)

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  • 3
    +1 for affected, to describe artificial/deliberately adopted mannerisms solely for the purpose of attracting attention – Some_Guy Jul 7 '15 at 7:53
  • I wish I could explain this better, there's a single word for that in my language but I cant explain that well in English. The behavior is "staged" and mostly to attract others' attention. – Tanivr Jul 8 '15 at 6:16
7

Perhaps animated is the word you are after.

From Merriam-Webster:

animated

  1. endowed with life or the qualities of life : alive
  2. full of movement and activity < an animated crowd >
  3. full of vigor and spirit : lively < an animated discussion >
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  • do you mean an animated boy or girl? – Jaeger Jay Jul 7 '15 at 6:54
  • I wouldd say something like "He/she was animated during our discussion regarding foo yesterday.". Don't think I like the sound of "He/she is an animated boy/girl." – shree.pat18 Jul 7 '15 at 7:06
  • how about attention seeker? – Jaeger Jay Jul 7 '15 at 7:07
  • Not necessarily interchangeable. What if I gesticulate a lot or modulate my voice a lot to emphasise something in a fervent discussion? That might justify my actions without having to be associated with the negative connotations of attention-seeking. – shree.pat18 Jul 7 '15 at 7:10
  • I wish I could explain this better, there's a single word for that in my language but I cant explain that well in English. The behavior is "staged" and mostly to attract others' attention. – Tanivr Jul 8 '15 at 6:16
5

A literal alternative could be gesticulator

gesticulate: Use gestures, especially dramatic ones, instead of speaking or to emphasize one’s words

He describes the fascinating journey along the evolutionary path that ‘converted us from wild gesticulators to smooth talkers.’

(Oxford)

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  • How does it convey the childish manner of gesticulating or childish whim? I am acquainted with some people who gesticulate and speak loudly because of their temperament but they are not like kids in terms of their behaviour. – user109460 Jul 7 '15 at 11:29
  • Italians are gesticulators because they are full of emotions and this is their nature. But we would not compare them with kids. :) – user109460 Jul 7 '15 at 11:33
  • @Amande: Fair point. But I think (or rather, hope) that the 'childish whim' part isn't terribly important to the OP. Using gestures is. – Tushar Raj Jul 7 '15 at 12:40
  • +1..It reminds me of "mudra"...(n ritual hand movement in Hindu religious dancing-TFD) Type of: gesture.to express a thought or feeling. :)- – Misti Jul 7 '15 at 16:26
  • @Mysti: Thanks. You don't have to translate mudra for me, you know. I'm Hindu. (Not much of a dancer, though!) – Tushar Raj Jul 7 '15 at 16:28
1

Compulsive talker: sb who talks in a continuos manner to seek attention
Prattler: sb who talks in a childish manner

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-1

How about attention seeker. It fits your description.

Attention seeking is behaving in a way which is in pursuit of attention from others. Where such behaviour is excessive and inappropriate, the term is often used pejoratively in respect of children's behaviour in front of peers, or negative domestic interactions.

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  • I wish I could explain this better, there's a single word for that in my language but I cant explain that well in English. The behavior is "staged" and mostly to attract others' attention. – Tanivr Jul 8 '15 at 6:17

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