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I was wondering, can you say ''You could have seemed [...]'', like... you didn't seem too intelligent but you could have seemed so had you quoted... Cioran, for example. I'm yet to encounter this form so I was wondering if it's possible as we use it rather frequently in my language which is Romanian.

Anyway, my other perplexity is the following:

'' You could've quoted Cioran instead, and seemed well-read.''

'' You could've quoted Cioran instead, and seem well-read.''

Which one is correct? I was inclined to think that the first one is, at first, as I've used the past participle in ''could've quoted'' so I assumed that I should do same with ''seem'', but then I reconsidered, and found out that I was, probably, wrong, as I don't need to use that tense again, although I'm referring to exactly the same time.. So, the second one is correct, right?

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You didn't seem too intelligent but you could have seemed so, had you quoted Cioran. (correct)

You could've quoted Cioran instead, and seemed well-read. (grammatically correct)

You could've quoted Cioran instead, and appeared well-read. (perhaps stylistically better)

You could've quoted Cioran instead, and seem well-read. (wrong - mixed tenses)

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"Seemed" is correct as both past tense and past participle, according to the OED: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/learner/seem

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