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Ok, English is my second language, and sometimes I have the following confusing situation.

When on the train, I told a friend of mine that “My company is not doing well these days. By my company I mean the company that I am working for, not the company that I own. Native speakers often think I own a company.

If I say “the company that I am working for is not doing well these days”, then it will be too long.

How can I express the idea that I am not the owner of the company I am working for?

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    ...Our company? – Edwin Ashworth Jul 5 '15 at 8:39
  • just that simple? – Tom Jul 5 '15 at 8:40
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    Context is important. 'The company that I am working for is not doing well these days' distances you from the company (which you may want to do). – Edwin Ashworth Jul 5 '15 at 8:42
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    I often refer to my employer as "my company" though it would be ambiguous without context. In the absence of such context, you can provide it by using the "too long" version, which isn't that long after all, or by saying "my employer isn't...." – phoog Jul 5 '15 at 9:11
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    The company you're working for is your company. Few people would assume you own the company if you call it yours. – Robusto Jul 5 '15 at 10:38
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In the US, if you say, "My company is not doing well these days," most folks will assume that you are referring to the company you work for.

If you say, "My business is not doing well these days," they'll assume that you're the boss.

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