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I was watching a show on TV (I escaped my killer) and Lisa Noland is dropped off after being raped several times by her attacker and to her surprise he doesn't kill her, drops her off at her neighborhood. Then Lisa says:

I just started running. Every time a car went by, I hit the road. I said "He's coming back, he's coming back for me and I just kept running."

Hit the road as far as the dictionaries go means like "to get on the way, to start a journey etc"

Why is she getting back on the road where she should get off the road, hide or something?

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    Without more context it's hard to say. She could mean simply that she ducked down -- "hit the dirt". Or it could be that "car went by" means someone suspicious (to her) was seen in her neighborhood, in which case she might indeed leave town. – Hot Licks Jul 4 '15 at 20:58
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    The context is that she is in her neighbourhood after being dropped off. I'd paraphrase: 'I ran from where he'd left me. If I stopped for a rest and a car approached, I hid behind a hedge to let it past, then moved off fast.' – Edwin Ashworth Jul 4 '15 at 21:04
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Hit the road doesn't just mean to leave, nor does it necessarily mean you are actually on a road. The origin of the term is from horses hitting the road with their hooves. And technically, just walking would be "hitting the road" since you'd be stamping your feet against it. The same for a car with it's tire.

The underlying meaning though is to be moving fast. To get out. It can be an offensive way to tell someone to just .... well, leave.

Nowadays, the idiom doesn't carry as much offense to it as it used to, and more often than not, people proclaim that they themselves are getting ready to hit the road, contradicting it's use as an offensive idiom.

It was good seeing you Aunt Martha but I have to hit the road now.

So you're mistaken when you think that she is off the road. The context means that when she heard a car, she hit the ground running, she moved fast.

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hit the road (meaning in context)


"... hit the road" may also have the meaning to LEAVE, in which case:

I just started running. Every time a car went by, I hit the road. I said 

"He's coming back, he's coming back for me and I just kept running."

hitting the road, in context, means: LEAVE.

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