5

Example:

Someone talks loudly with the people from her past while "imagining" them to be present in the current situation when they actually aren't.
This person does it consciously and gets instant gratification from it.

What is this action called?

  • Intensely annoying? Profoundly disturbing? Deplorably infantile? – StoneyB Jul 1 '15 at 6:04
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    This person probably is still working through grief, bereavement. – user66974 Jul 1 '15 at 6:19
  • @Josh61 +1 bereavement - that's a big word. Learned something today – RexYuan Jul 1 '15 at 6:55
  • Or schizophrenia. – Robusto Jul 1 '15 at 9:23
5

You could say she was play-acting.

Or playing make-believe.

  1. (disapproving) imagining or pretending things to be different or more exciting than they really are

They live in a world of make-believe.

  1. imagining that something is real, or that you are somebody else, for example in a child’s game

‘Let's play make-believe,’ said Sam.

  • 1
    From: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizophrenia Schizophrenia ... is a mental disorder often characterized by abnormal social behavior and failure to recognize what is real. In my case, I said that the person does it consciously. She knows what she is doing and does it because she gets instant gratification from it. – Aquarius_Girl Jul 1 '15 at 5:49
  • @TheIndependentAquarius: Got it. Edited. Take a look. – Tushar Raj Jul 1 '15 at 6:03
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    That makes much more sense. Can I say - > She make-believes all the time, and she is make-believing right now? Are they correct? – Aquarius_Girl Jul 1 '15 at 6:04
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    @TheIndependentAquarius: I think so. But a native speaker is more likely to say for sure. – Tushar Raj Jul 1 '15 at 6:07
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Confabulation feels too good to ignore:

verb

[NO OBJECT]
1 formal Engage in conversation; talk:
she could be heard on the telephone confabulating with someone

2 Psychiatry Fabricate imaginary experiences as compensation for loss of memory:
she has lapses in attention and concentration—she may be confabulating a little
ODO

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