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I'm not looking for any derogatory term, but for something that the woman herself would say

Example:

He was a good guy. Not sure why I was so sure of that. Maybe it was a skill that I developed when I was a [...].

marked as duplicate by Dan Bron, Nicole, choster, ghoppe, Mari-Lou A Jun 25 '15 at 16:51

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"Flirt" comes to mind. Actually, a whole bunch of phrases/terms come to mind but they would descend in to the "derogatory" category and, as such, wouldn't apply.

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Temptress

temptress ˈtɛm(p)trɪs/ noun a woman who tempts someone to do something, typically a sexually attractive woman who sets out to allure or seduce someone.(Source:Google.com)

  • along the same lines: seductress – Avon Jun 25 '15 at 15:41
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Many of the words for sexual behavior have cultural prejudices built in, so I think many nouns and adjectives are already going to stack the cards against you. "Flirty," "Promiscuous," and "Temptress," read like euphemisms for loose behavior. I'd look for phrases. If you're looking for a word for a woman who actively dates around, enjoys the company of men, but isn't a tease, consider,

dating around:

He was a good guy. Not sure why I was so sure of that. Maybe it was a skill that I developed when I was dating around.

man-chaser, used wryly:

He was a good guy. Not sure why I was so sure of that. Maybe it was a skill that I developed when I was chasing men.

these seem like a better fit, especially since the woman in question has dated "good" men and good men don't usually go for flirty, flighty, teasing, temptresses.

sources: dictionary.com, myself.

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IMHO, most of these answers are pretty judgmental. Simply referring to the lady in question as a "single-girl/gal" would imply that she "chased" men, without casting aspersions at her character.

(A single woman who does not chase men is known as a/an "old-maid", "spinster", "cat-person" or, lesbian.)

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He was a good guy. Not sure why I was so sure of that. Maybe it was a skill that I developed when I was sowing my wild oats.

Go through a period of wild or promiscuous behaviour while young:

he sowed his wild oats before settling down

Your hunt for a single word notwithstanding, this is how I'd put it. It isn't offensive (on the contrary, it can be humorous).

EDIT: In my opinion, the expression can be used by a girl. Though etymologically it looks like it's restricted to men, as @Janus pointed out.

In any case, I'd let my female character use it.

For a single word, consider the one in the definition: promiscuous.

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    Uh, hmm, you don't think planting seed is connotative of men? – Dan Bron Jun 25 '15 at 15:26
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    @DanBron: I don't think anything in English is restrictive to men anymore, including the word man :) – Tushar Raj Jun 25 '15 at 15:28
  • Well, man has a very long history of not being restricted to XYs; that, at least, is not a new thing! – Dan Bron Jun 25 '15 at 15:30
  • @TusharRaj The word man has never been restricted to males. Its original meaning was ‘human being’, and it has kept that meaning for millennia; the secondary development of ‘human’ → ‘male human’ is a later one. Sowing one’s wild oats, however, is a direct analogy to sowing seed, putting one’s seed in fertile ground, etc.—all metaphoric descriptions of the exclusively male part of coitus. See also World Wide Words’ piece on the expression. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jun 25 '15 at 15:30
  • @DanBron: Besides, even if it is, the context makes it clear. I'm assuming Jano needs it for his novel. Writers have more licence than usual in these matters. – Tushar Raj Jun 25 '15 at 15:31

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