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  1. The arils contain a smaller seed in a juicier pulp which varies from a light pink to a deep red in color.
  2. The arils contain a smaller seed in a juicier pulp which varies from light pink to deep red.

In first sentence, the indefinite articles before "light pink" "and "deep red" belong to the words "pink" and "red", signaling that they are not adjectives but nouns. "In color" looks redundant: if a pulp is red, it is necessarily "in color."

Is there a difference in meaning between the two sentences, or is it just a stylistic thing?

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    The two sentences denote the same set of facts. The phrase "in color" could be placed after "varies". *...varies in color from a light pink to a deep red". Placed there it signals the type of variation, giving the listener a cue regarding the phrase to follow. Placed at the end of the sentence, it confirms that the variation was color-variation -- in case the listener has not caught on to the idea yet :) I think it is better immediately after "varies". – TRomano Jun 22 '15 at 13:11
  • Juicier? (One of those little letters which can suffer from typoid.) – Margana Jun 22 '15 at 13:28
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    I'd prefer your first variant to Tim's suggested third. And I think 'vary in color' (whether separated or not) is idiomatically necessary (varies from A to B sounds unnatural). – Edwin Ashworth Jun 22 '15 at 14:50
  • I prefer the versions with "a" instead of the ones without an article. "Light pink" and "deep red" are not defined so it gives a clue that a kind of this color is referred to not the (defined) color e.g. German telecom Magenta or UPS Pullman Brown. – Daniel Jun 22 '15 at 15:01
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As TRomano observes in a comment beneath the question, the sentences

The arils contain a smaller seed in a juicier pulp which varies from a light pink to a deep red in color.

and

The arils contain a smaller seed in a juicier pulp which varies from light pink to deep red.

convey the same information. The primary difference is that the second wording makes explicit the point that the category of variation being described is color—although most readers are likely to figure this out from the nature of the range markers "light pink" and "deep red."

Having said that, I agree with TRomano (again) that if you want to explicitly identify "color" as the category of variation involved, you might as well do it before identifying the range, not afterward. In that case, if I were copyediting the original sentence, I would be inclined to phrase it as follows:

The arils contain a smaller seed in a juicier pulp whose color may vary from light pink to deep red.

But my preference for that wording is based on considerations of writing style, not of syntactical correctness.

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