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I am doing an online news update for my company and though 3 of us have tried we can't work out a good synonym for the phrase dial into.

The sentence reads:-

Also with the summer holidays looming you may find yourself short staffed, but with the SIP Soft-phone anyone can dial into company calls, whether they are at work, at home or even in the Mediterranean soaking up the sun.

We were wondering if there is a better way to say dial into, it has to do with making business calls when you are out of the office and you can make or receive them.

It's just a small quandary but if you have any ideas I'll welcome them.

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    What do you mean by "dial into"? Join conference calls? – deadrat Jun 22 '15 at 9:53
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    Probably connect to company calls. – user66974 Jun 22 '15 at 9:54
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  • .......... join – aparente001 Dec 10 '16 at 7:25
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If company calls refers to any calls related to the business of the company, then possible idiomatic phrases would be

place company calls

make company calls

receive company calls

get company calls

If company calls refers to conference calls already in progress:

join company calls

join in on company calls

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I would replace the term dial up with a more modern analogue, such as access, connect, log in, or some similar modern construct. I haven't yet seen a smartphone with a rotary dial and I suspect there are many people who have only ever seen a rotary dial telephone set in a movie, old photo, or in a museum.

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I think that it might be wise to use the phrase 'dial-in', but to supplement it with another verb that explicitly states what action is occurring. That should make your sentence read more clearly.

Dialling-in to a call is one of several methods of joining a call - an alternative being a caller dialling-in to you, or you joining via a computer, etc. Hence, I think it's necessary to preserve that term because it clarifies the specific mechanism of your system.

You could go with:

Also, with the summer holidays looming, you may find yourself short staffed, but with the SIP Soft-phone anyone can join company calls by simply 'dialling-in' from their local phone, whether they are at work, at home or even in the Mediterranean soaking up the sun.

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    Thanks for revising, however I prefer the British spelling - 'dialling' - and I believe that it is just as valid as that with a single 'l'. – Charon Jun 22 '15 at 10:37

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