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I recently saw the sentence

You won't have a long time to wait to do something.

I would have used

You won't have a long time to wait before doing something.

By the way, is there a difference between

I have waited to see the moon

and

I have waited before seeing the moon?

5

I see a difference in nuance between the two items you present. The former, I have waited to see the moon, to me implies that the moon was of particular significance, and was the specific object you were waiting for. The latter, I have waited before seeing the moon suggests to me that the moon was not the specific object of the wait, for example you were waiting for a cab for an extended period of time, during which you happened to notice the moon.

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    I wouldn't call that a nuance. That's a huuge difference in meaning. The sentences don't remotely mean the same thing. – RegDwigнt Jun 22 '15 at 10:39
2

Look through this eyepiece on the telescope. The comet is arriving soon. You won't have to wait long to see it.

Look through this eyepiece on the telescope. The comet is arriving soon. You won't have to wait long before seeing it.

It will come into view before long.

I have waited to see the comet. (expresses a recent intention)

I have waited before seeing the comet. (expresses a recent fact)

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