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I am not a native English speaker. I have been given the task of reviewing a text written in English. I wonder if I by the following use of the word "disjunction", make myself guilty of the very same crime I accuse my reviewee of, namely that he is using a particular word in a wrong way, simply to portray himself as being eloquent. I claim that "quantitative is used in disjunction to qualitative".

  • It is essentially true, in that disjunction means 'a lack of correspondence or consistency'. But I think a better illustrative sentence is the one my dictionary gives of There is a disjunction between the skills taught in education and those demanded in the labour market. Don't be afraid to use a dictionary yourself! – WS2 Jun 15 '15 at 23:17
  • I am not comparing the two words though. I commented on a particular usage of the word quantitative, and wanted to let the respondent know that quantitative is most often used as meaning the opposite of qualitative when collecting data. Not, as he thought, that a $200 car is "quantiatively cheap". I argued that he used the word to "appear eloquent", but now I regret my wordings since I fear I myself used "disjunction" to appear eloquent. Which I did :( – mickey Jun 15 '15 at 23:26
  • You are right to point out that quantitatively cheaper could be more easily said as, "less expensive" but I think if you had written your comment on my paper I would have been stumped as to what you meant. – Jim Jun 15 '15 at 23:31
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    If I understand correctly what you're saying, He's incorrect, you're unidiomatic. – Edwin Ashworth Jun 15 '15 at 23:36
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    Good point @Jim! Love this place :D – mickey Jun 15 '15 at 23:46
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You're simply looking for

contrast

or indeed

opposite

"quantitative is used in contrast to qualitative"

"quantitative is the opposite of qualitative"

As you say, "wanted to let the respondent know that quantitative is most often used as meaning the opposite of qualitative when collecting data".

There is no disjunction, whatsoever, between "quantitative" and "qualitative". They are just two words. A disjunction is a "thing" - rather like these "things": "a debate", "tension in the air", "a war", "an ongoing argument".

Please note that your sentence

"quantitative is most often used as meaning the opposite of qualitative when collecting data"

is perfectly correct and accurately explains that quantitative is most often used as meaning the opposite of qualitative when collecting data.

  • Just to keep on pounding my head against this stone wall a little longer, would this sentence be better; "quantitative is used disjunctively to qualitative"? – mickey Jun 16 '15 at 19:44
  • Although @JoeBlow, I wasn't "simply looking for contrast or opposite". I was indeed trying very hard myself to use words that I didn't quite comprehend, in order to appear eloquent. A nasty habit, that is sure to come around and bite you. – mickey Jun 16 '15 at 19:47
  • Hi Mickey. Answer: n-o, no. – Fattie Jun 17 '15 at 1:59

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