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I'm preparing a farewell email to my colleagues and want to use this phrase:

"Not only I am proud of the work we have accomplished together but also I have learned so much from you about statistics, sciences and beyond."

I'm not a native English speaker and wondering whether this is a conventional way. Could somebody have me some suggestions.

Thanks in advance.

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers, Edwin Ashworth, Drew, Marv Mills, Chenmunka Jun 17 '15 at 13:03

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A negative introduction (in the grammatical sense, not the semantic) requires that you invert the Subject-Verb order, so "am I" instead of "I am." Return to the regular order for the positive conclusion. It sounds slightly more natural to me to move "also" closer to the addition, "learned." Another quibble: "beyond" means farther, literally or metaphorically, so "beyond elementary statistics" would be fine, but you're listing fields of learning, so "more" would be more (so to speak) appropriate.

"Not only am I proud of the work we have accomplished together, but I have also learned so much from you about statistics, sciences, and more"

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Simplicity is the best decoration you can make. Its NOT ONLY simple BUT ALSO quite conventional.

But as alternatives, you may also consider these followings:-

  1. As well as: Eg.I am proud of the work we have accomplished together AS WELL AS I have learned so much from you about statistics, sciences and beyond.

  2. It has but whats more: Eg.It has made me proud of the work we have accomplished together BUT WHATS MORE I have learned so much from you about statistics, sciences and beyond.

Hope it helps 👍

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