1

Which one is most appropriate and why?

I will have my laptop next two weeks.

Or

I will have my laptop in 14 days from now.

4

British English would be: "I will have my laptop in two weeks time (or in a fortnight)."

2

Well, if you say

I will have my laptop 14 days from now (or in 14 days)

it carries considerably more (expected) precision than

I will have my laptop in 2 weeks (time)

because you're specifying the day in the former, and only the expected week in the latter (fortnight, imo, would also be specifying the day)

You can also say

I will have my laptop (some time) in the next two weeks

which can be any time between now and two weeks later.

1

Both sentences are badly constructed in my opinion. The first is missing a preposition. More clarity is achieved with:

My laptop will arrive in two weeks.

The laptop is the subject of the sentence, rather than you.

14 days or two weeks, or indeed a fortnight, is your choice, as all mean the same; do you want to imply an accurate measure of time, a general approximate or simply be expressive? "Two weeks" seems best.

0

Neither of those sentences sound completely natural, but they're not too far off. From the context of both sentences together, it seems like the idea is the person speaking will have a laptop after an interval of two weeks or 14 days.

The first could be:

I will have my laptop next in two weeks.

The second one could be:

I will have my laptop 14 days from now.

The two statements are slightly different. The first implies the person has had the laptop before and will have it again after an interval of two weeks. The second doesn't imply previous possession one way or another, just that the person will have the laptop in 14 days.

3
  • "Next in two weeks" makes no sense. Jun 14 '15 at 11:13
  • Sure it does, in the context of a sequence of events. "I last had my laptop yesterday, then I lent it to Steve. I will have my laptop next in two weeks. A week after that, Julie needs to borrow it." Jun 14 '15 at 11:53
  • Better yet, a sequence of possession. "Gonzalo had my laptop a month ago, then gave it to Steve, who has it now. I will have my laptop next in two weeks." Jun 14 '15 at 12:09

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