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What is the difference provider vs. caregiver, in a medical context? According to the dictionary definitions, the former provides, the latter cares… but in a medical context providing is pretty much caring, and by caring one provides care. So I am a bit confused.

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    Usually a provider is an institution or company which provides medical services or goods, particularly the entity which bills the insurance company. A caregiver is an actual human being. – StoneyB on hiatus Jun 13 '15 at 20:48
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    This is probably going to be one of those areas where arbitrary strict definitions are imposed by authorities / companies to aid them in their administration (but which correspondingly confuse the general public). – Edwin Ashworth Jun 13 '15 at 22:42
  • Thanks. Both comments could be converted into answers, which I'd gladly upvote :) – Franck Dernoncourt Jan 7 '16 at 17:16
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Usually a provider is an institution or company which provides medical services or goods, particularly the entity which bills the insurance company. A caregiver is an actual human being. – StoneyB

Although those words can vary between organizations.

This is probably going to be one of those areas where arbitrary strict definitions are imposed by authorities / companies to aid them in their administration (but which correspondingly confuse the general public). – Edwin Ashworth

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A caregiver is an unpaid person (usually a relative) that tends to someone needing personal services. A care provider is an institution that pays someone in a professional capacity to tend to someone needing that service.

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    Fred, I think Edwin's comment (which Helmar converted into an answer) is pertinent. Is a caregiver necessarily unpaid? I suspect that in the medical/welfare context this would depend on local bureaucratic definition. In my city, professionals employed to provide at-home care are given the same label as unpaid family doing the same thing: "carers". "Caregiver" is not generally used here due to the ambiguity about who it covers. But in another jurisdiction the application might be quite different. – Chappo Says Reinstate Monica Nov 30 '18 at 6:43

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