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Which one of the following is the right way to ask someone about his turn or number for an interview etc: Has your turn approached/reached? Is it your turn yet? Thanks

closed as off-topic by Fattie, Janus Bahs Jacquet, Chenmunka, Drew, Edwin Ashworth Jun 13 '15 at 10:49

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    Ask on the excellent ELL site. This question will be moved there. – Fattie Jun 12 '15 at 3:30
  • @Joe Blow You really think they want questions showing no sign of research on ELL? – Edwin Ashworth Jun 13 '15 at 10:51
  • You know how Douglas Adams had an S.E.P. ? that's like M.I.S.E.P. :) – Fattie Jun 13 '15 at 11:16
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Usually, an AmE speaker would say

  • Is it your turn yet?

Your other way is not completely wrong; it just asks something slightly different—you might be asking whether it is nearly his turn yet. But you would not say that the turn has "approached" or "reached". For "approached" you might say

  • Isn't it almost time for your turn?

Or

  • Seems like it ought to be your turn by now.

Either of these expresses that you agree with his feeling that he has been made to wait too long.

For "reached" you might say

  • Has your turn come yet?

This is identical in meaning to "Is it your turn yet?"

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I would have to say that "Is it your turn yet" is the most valid one.

Has your turn approached would not work since approach usually refers to someone/something moving towards you and not an abstract concept of a 'turn'.

And as for reaching, it is you making progress towards something. You are not reaching anything, you are just waiting.

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Thanks a million Slava and Brian, I couldn't have done it without you. Actually I'm non native English learner and want to improve and prctice my daily life English. May I ask auch questions in future also, if you don't mind?

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