7

Which is correct?

  • I haven't gotten any sleep since Monday

  • I haven't got any sleep since Monday

(Are both of these sentences wrong? Should I use "I haven't slept since Monday" instead?)

Thank you x

3
  • Answered at Difference between “I have got” and “I have gotten”. Jun 9, 2015 at 19:54
  • It depends on what you want to say. If you want to say about you not getting sleep or if you haven't slept.
    – Asker123
    Jun 9, 2015 at 20:19
  • British idioms, in order of my own preference would be 1. I haven't slept since Monday. 2. I haven't had any sleep since Monday. Sometimes people will say I can't get any sleep...(with all the noise from downstairs).. It would be unusual to hear the past tense "got" in this context. As a very general rule "get, got and gotten" tend to be American, the last one exclusively American.
    – WS2
    Dec 2, 2017 at 14:28

3 Answers 3

9

An American might say I have not gotten any sleep since Monday

A British person would not say that. They MIGHT say I have not got any sleep since Monday but, in my view, it is not really idiomatic in any UK register. Others may disagree.

I might say either I have not had any sleep since Monday, or I have not slept since Monday.

The past participle gotten is to all intents obsolete in British idiomacy.

1
  • +1 for mentioning "haven't had any sleep". I would also agree about the second sentence being non-idiomatic for British English.
    – Grizzled
    Jun 9, 2015 at 22:27
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Are both of these sentences wrong? Should I use "I haven't slept since Monday" instead?)

It is really your choice, it mostly depends on what you want to say. Although I doubt it would make a huge difference if you used the second one. If you want to say about you not getting sleep or if you haven't slept.


Also remember that: gotten is the standard past participle for American English. While got is the past participle used commonly in British English.

I am new here so my answers may not be perfect.

2

You can definitely say "I haven't slept since Monday" to avoid the "got-gotten" problem. The other two expressions are not wrong, but readers may have different opinions on the usage, depending on what they are used to (their backgrounds).

If you are interested, here are two articles on this "Got vs. Gotten" topic for you: http://grammarist.com/usage/got-gotten/ http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/aue/gotten.html

Enjoy reading!

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