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EB size and structure is known to influence differentiation potential, and the microwell system provides a robust, efficient method of producing EBs of any size or shape.

I've seen many sentences in which a comma is used, IMO, instead of "and". In fact, I'm following this trend in my writings. However, I'm not aware if there is any rule governing this. Is such a choice available in every situation? Does the choice ever affect the meaning?

  • is this more na ELL question? – Fattie Jun 8 '15 at 8:17
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    Have a look at 'Are commas necessary between coordinate adjectives?', looking particularly at what coordinate adjectives are. As an overview, I'd say that 'a long thin metal bar' sounds far more natural than 'a long and thin metal bar' (though the latter is not ungrammatical), with 'a small and brown dog' being unacceptable. However, 'a robust and efficient method ...' perhaps sounds better than 'a robust, efficient method'.... – Edwin Ashworth Jun 8 '15 at 8:20
  • It's a matter of style here, with the 'and' separating the different domains more effectively than a comma. The fact that 'long thin' is a far commoner string (probably even a collocation) than 'robust effficient' is doubtless also a factor. – Edwin Ashworth Jun 8 '15 at 8:25
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    BTW Ellia, and always useful tip is simply write shorter sentences. Just do it always in all cases. EB size and structure is known to influence differentiation potential,. The microwell system provides a robust, efficient method of producing EBs of any size or shape. – Fattie Jun 8 '15 at 8:36

protected by NVZ Feb 4 '17 at 16:01

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