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Can someone please expound 'the process of transition' (from this explanation) that I pinpointed with a red arrow beneath? Please see the titled question.

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  • i think it's simply leaving off the final of the three words. so it was originally someting like "forth with urgency" or "forth with vigour". As it says, it is short for "forth with (preposition)". Also, you're familiar with the form "go forth with pride.." "go forth with a smile" – Fattie Jun 5 '15 at 3:15
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This very query has just been answered by World Wide Words. Here's an extract:

Round the middle of the twelfth century, the phrase forth mid appeared (mid being essentially the same as the modern German word mit, with), later forth with, to go somewhere in the company of other people. Necessarily, if you go forth with others, you go at the same time as they do. It seems this sense of time eventually took over, though the process of transition isn’t very clear, and it’s mixed up with other phrases that also referred to time. Certainly, by about 1450 the phrase had condensed to a single adverb with the modern meaning of immediately, without delay.

  • Thanks. But is there more info or some way of explaining the following from your answer? It seems this sense of time eventually took over, though the process of transition isn’t very clear, and it’s mixed up with other phrases that also referred to time. – Greek - Area 51 Proposal Jun 5 '15 at 14:51
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    @LawArea51Proposal-Commit Transformations like that just happen naturally because people conflate related concepts. How can you ask so many questions about etymology and not realize this yet? – Barmar Jun 5 '15 at 19:55

protected by MetaEd Jun 25 '18 at 22:19

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