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People tend to let capability mislead priority. We refer to this as "a solution in search of a problem". If your job is to point these out to people, it would be nice to do so with a single word.

Any ideas ?

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    I'm pretty sure there IS NO single-word, for that idiom. As WBT pointed out, "a hammer in search of a nail" is a similar idiom. – Fattie Jun 4 '15 at 5:31
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    What's wrong with more than one word? – Mitch Jun 4 '15 at 14:48
  • It's such a useful concept, it just seems like something that should have its own word. Do any other languages have a word for this? – WBT Jun 6 '15 at 12:55
  • I think 'solution in search of a problem' is probably the best phrase to use. It's well recognised. – dwjohnston Feb 11 '16 at 22:33
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I usually refer to (and hear others refer to) such solutions as a hammer in reference to Maslow's Hammer and various sayings to the effect of, "if you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail." (Meaning: One who has some tool or solution will tend to see problems as those that can be addressed by that tool/solution, even if that really isn't the right one for that problem.)

Effective use of the term requires the recipient to be already familiar with the concept/proverb, and a context where it's clear that you're not referring to any literal hammer.

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Google defines the adjective opportunistic as exploiting chances offered by immediate circumstances without reference to a general plan or moral principle.

While the Free Dictionary describes one who behaves in such a way as an opportunist defined as a person who takes advantage of any opportunity to achieve an end, often with no regard for principles or consequences.

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I am not aware of a single word meaning a 'solution in search of a problem'.

You might, however, say that the process is counter-intuitive, or contrary to intuition or to common-sense expectation.

Source: ODO

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