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Is it okay to use the counterfactual subjuntive verb phrase, "were to" with the present tense of a main clause? I thought that "if subject + were to + verb" should be used with "would" or "could" in a main clause bcause I was taught that it shows something is highly unlikely or unthinkable.

Does "were to" mean "suppose" or "imagine," which expresses possible and factual situations?

Please read the following excerpt. "If one were to use the Hallyu phenomenon as a measuring stick for the Korean government's culture policies to establish a new Korean identity internationally, it is clear that it has succeeded beyond anyone's wildest expectations. "

Is the present tense of the main clause grammatically correct? Then, how could we parse the sentence? Is it kind of a mixed conditional? I'm not sure what we should call that type of sentence, conditional? or subjunctive?

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    You are right. It needs to be, "If one were to use ... it would be clear that" – Jim Jun 2 '15 at 9:37
  • I think the simple present works better here. "If one uses the Hallyu phenomenon as a measuring stick for the Korean government's culture policies to establish a new Korean identity internationally, one can see clearly that it has succeeded beyond anyone's wildest expectations." – Edwin Ashworth Jun 2 '15 at 10:28
  • Cross-link: See also english.stackexchange.com/questions/250057/… – WBT Jun 3 '15 at 1:50
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The excerpt strikes my American ear as ungrammatical. I want either "would be clear" if were to remains, or Using instead of "If one were to".

If one were to use the Hallyu phenomenon as a measuring stick ...it would be clear that it has succeeded beyond anyone's wildest expectations.

Using the Hallyu phenomenon as a measuring stick ...it is clear that it has succeeded beyond anyone's wildest expectations.

*If I were to call it something, I call it a "derailment".

  • Thanks, Tim Romano. So do you mean "were to" does not work with the present tense? And it is ungrammatical for the reason, right? The participle clause that starts with "using" is still in the conditional mood? – cellardoor Jun 3 '15 at 0:12
  • "If one were to" is the future conditional tense. The second clause should also be future conditional in that case. – Vincent McNabb Jun 3 '15 at 3:45
  • @VincentMcNabb What do you mean? I'm confused about the term, the future conditional. Is it will or would? – cellardoor Jun 3 '15 at 5:19
  • "were to {infinitive}" denotes a hypothetical situation. "If I were to buy another car, it would be a Tesla." – TRomano Jun 4 '15 at 22:07
  • "Using the Hallyu phenomenon as a measuring stick..." is not a hypothetical but a conditional. When we use the Hallyu... (not "if we use"). – TRomano Jun 4 '15 at 22:08

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