1

what is the meaning of

There are worse ways doing this than that.

For example:

There are worse ways spending this evening than coming to the meeting.

Does this mean coming to the meeting isn't that bad?

There are worse ways to die than drowning.

Does this mean drowning isn't the worst thing? Or the other way round?

  • Hi, this very basic question migh be better suited at the English Language Learner SE site ell.stackexchange.com – P. O. May 29 '15 at 14:42
2

Each of those sentences can be split up into three parts:

There are worse ways to die than drowning.

  • Drowning is a way to die.
  • You may think that drowning is a bad way to die.
  • But there are other ways to die that are worse.

There are worse ways spending this evening than coming to the meeting.

  • Coming to the meeting is a way to spend this evening.
  • You may think it is a bad way to spend the evening.
  • But there are other ways to spend the evening that are worse.

So your assumed meaning is correct: attending the meeting is not the worst thing and drowning is not the worst way to die.

  • Yeah i get this is the literal meaning of it ! but what is its actual meaning? i see some people said ' There are worse ways to die than to die know someone loves you' I think it doesn't simply means what the words mean? Any actual meaning behind it? – cdomxd Jun 1 '15 at 10:10
  • @cdomxd It means exactly what it means literally. No hidden meanings, unless people start using metaphors in the sentence (but that has nothing to do with this construction per se). The example you give is ungrammatical, but my guess is that they mean that dying when you know someone loves you is better than dying without that. Simply the literal meaning. – oerkelens Jun 1 '15 at 11:24

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