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Many times, I saw an "e" on some names. For example:

blackthorne

Is this only for decoration, or is the extra "e" from old english? Or maybe spelling for certain cultures?

  • Yes, all of the above. It's often added to "invented" names to make them seem higher-class. Sometimes the extra "e" is just an accident of history -- when the spelling was "hardened" vs what the style was at that moment, sometimes the extra "e" is due to it being "borrowed" from French or some other language. (Net: Aside from its possible effect on pronunciation the extra "e" is meaningless.) – Hot Licks May 27 '15 at 11:43
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    So when a business calls itself Ye Olde Shoppe it is just to attract the rubes? – GEdgar May 27 '15 at 13:50
  • @GEdgar Exactly. It looks French, which suggests high class, but the French never spelled it like that. – Barmar May 28 '15 at 4:58
  • @GEdgar: Not quite. "Ye" and "olde" are real words widely used in old English, but "shoppe" isn't. – user21820 May 28 '15 at 7:08
  • @user21820 Ok. I know these are widely used. But excluding them, some names have it for decoration or accident of history, as Hot Licks said – TheBro21 May 28 '15 at 7:14
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Yes, all of the above. It's often added to "invented" names to make them seem higher-class. Sometimes the extra "e" is just an accident of history -- when the spelling was "hardened" vs what the style was at that moment, sometimes the extra "e" is due to it being "borrowed" from French or some other language. (Net: Aside from its possible effect on pronunciation the extra "e" is meaningless.)

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