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In a project management context where A and B would be tasks, if A needs B, then B is a dependency of A. Is there a word to describe what A is to B?

As @KateGregory put it, I want to replace "we need to get B done, a lot of things are depending on it" to "we need to get B done, it has a lot of X" where X is the word I'm looking for.

I'm talking about the English concept, not the logical implication, though they're clearly related. Predecessor / successor is not what I'm looking for.

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  • Yes, you just used it. "needs"
    – Greg Lee
    Commented May 26, 2015 at 16:38
  • No, "needs" is still B. I want A. Commented May 26, 2015 at 16:40
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    More context would help. Is it about politics?
    – Centaurus
    Commented May 26, 2015 at 16:41
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    Unless this is to be used in a very restricted domain, there is no word. For example put A=human and B=oxygen. Then A needs B, but oxygen really couldn't care anything about humans.
    – A.Ellett
    Commented May 26, 2015 at 16:47
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    to clarify, you want to replace "we need to get B done, a lot of things are depending on it" to "we need to get B done, it has a lot of X" where X is the word you're looking for? Commented May 26, 2015 at 16:54

1 Answer 1

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As discussed in What is the correct word for "dependee"?: The dependent depends on the dependency.

we need to get B done, it has a lot of dependents.

Here are some more phrases which mean the same as each other:

  • A (the dependent) depends on B (the dependency)
  • A requires B
  • A is made available by B
  • A is an opportunity from B
  • B is a prerequisite of A
  • B blocks A
  • B allows A
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  • 1
    It sounds ambiguous to me (non-native English-speaker), but I admit this is the closest I could get. Commented May 26, 2015 at 18:09
  • Over in US, we use the term "dependents" once a year when filing taxes. There is a different tax policy that applies when you have a different number of dependents (people that depend on your income).
    – Amy B
    Commented May 26, 2015 at 18:11

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