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I would like to ask if the phrase to put into relation to each other is correct English. I only found a few hits in the Internet and it looks like many of these sources were written in German.

I do not know how to describe it in my own words, but with to put into relation to each other I roughly mean to compare something with each other.

For example:

In general, the purpose of this process is not to rate the absolute quality of a result, but rather to put the qualities of several results in relation to each other.

If any one of you speak German, by to put into relation to each other I mean in Relation zueinander setzen.

Thank you very much,

Alex

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  • thanks for your fast answer. I actually want to use it in a mathematical context. So if I understand your answer correctly, it is grammatically correct to use it like in the sentence above?
    – Alex
    May 21, 2015 at 23:19
  • most definitely it is correct. In any other context outside of math, you'll probably get strange looks because it does sound odd. But within mathematics it's perfectly good English.
    – A.Ellett
    May 21, 2015 at 23:21
  • thanks :-) (To be precise, I will use it in the context of computer science. But it is a theoretical discussion and therefore similar to a mathematical one.)
    – Alex
    May 21, 2015 at 23:27

3 Answers 3

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"To put into relation to each other" could just mean to set up a correlation between two sets of objects: "Apple, Orange, Banana" can be put into relation to "Car, Bus, Bike" as "Apple and Car, Orange and Bus, Banana and Bike". It'd be a strange to find outside of anything but a mathematics context.

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comparative analysis

Is the general term for this kind of thing in English. Researching that term might yield more useful information.

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I think the text you presented would be better rendered as:

In general, the purpose of this process is not to rate the absolute quality of a result, but to juxtapose the qualities of several results.

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