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We were taught at school that if we want to make something plural, we should add "s" at the end. Later on, I learned that there are uncountable nouns. Not so much familiar with it. Can you please give some examples?

closed as off-topic by Andrew Leach May 20 '15 at 6:38

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  • Offhand I can just give you one: furniture – meneldal May 20 '15 at 5:43
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Uncountable nouns are substances, concepts etc that we cannot divide into separate elements. We cannot count them.

For example,

tea
sugar
water
air
rice
knowledge
beauty
anger
fear
love
money
research
safety
evidence

Lets look at some sentence examples. We can use some and any with uncountable nouns:

-I've got some money

-Have you got any rice?

Please see links for further explanation

https://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/nouns-uncountable-list.htm

  • +1, but note that almost all of those words are also sometimes countable, with well-attested plurals. (I don't think I've ever heard rices, knowledges, angers, or evidences, but the rest are unexceptionable.) – ruakh May 20 '15 at 6:12
  • @ruakh Evidences does exist, but the form is either obsolete, obsolescent, or very specialised. – Andrew Leach May 20 '15 at 6:36

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