5

Something like,

'Because' cannot be used in a sentence more than once because...

How to explain these sentences?

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    Can you please provide a better explanation of your problem and the solution you need? Maybe it's just me, but I am not sure I grasped what you are asking... – Alenanno May 10 '11 at 17:21
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    Something like "Is this meaning okay: 'The police suck because they are bad because they only want my money'?", perhaps? – Shathur May 10 '11 at 17:35
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    On a totally unrelated note, a sentence should not end in because, because because is a conjunction. – RegDwigнt May 10 '11 at 18:20
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    @MrHen: I was trying to make a different point. But if you insist: it's hard to construct a sentence that mentions three time in a row the word because because because is a conjunction. – RegDwigнt May 10 '11 at 18:51
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    @Kirk, there are no grammatical rules that forbid any word from occurring twice in a sentence. Any word can occur multiple times in a sentence. – nohat May 24 '11 at 6:49
7

Because of this, and because of that, something happened.

That's a perfectly valid English sentence. It's a little flowery, something you might see in a book, but it's not wrong to use "because" twice. Others might prefer the following:

Because of this and that, something happened.

But it's just preference.

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    It might also be repeated for dramatic effect: `Because our forefathers ate pie, because our children like pie, because scary clowns fear banana-creme pie -- for all these reasons, we must eat pie!" – Will Martin May 10 '11 at 22:14
  • Dramatic effect: "If ever, oh ever, a Wiz there was The Wizard of Oz is one because Because, because, because, because, because... Because of the wonderful things he does." en.wikiquote.org/wiki/The_Wizard_of_Oz – Wayfaring Stranger Jan 21 '12 at 18:35
0

Sometimes instead of:

"'Because' cannot be used in a sentence more than once because...."

I use a colon:

"'Because' cannot be used in a sentence more than once: it's repetitive and it puts the reader right to sleep."

0

It doesn't sound good. Because, since, for, as are used to give reasons. for your example:

As (since, cause of) ..., 'Because' cannot be used in a sentence more than once.

OR

Because cannot be used in a sentence more than once, for ...

But because puts more emphasis on the reason!

Here is a good explanation.

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